gototopgototop
 

Justice: Memory, Narration and Culture

This line of research aims to construct a theory of justice that truly takes into account and relates the dimensions of time, space, narration and cultural diversity.

  • The temporal dimension of justice raises the role of memory within the theory of justice. This approach allows us to construct a theory of historical responsibility, of the place of past injustices in the present, and of the political significance of historical memory. A theory of justice which takes memory into account is novel, hence the need to construct a set of tools for argument for this new task. That is what we intend to do, with the incorporation of narration. Thanks to the stories we tell, figures like the witness or the victim take on key roles in the theory of justice.
  • The spatial dimension of justice is expressed in the modern concept of global justice. In an economically globalised world, justice transcends State borders and obliges us to consider it globally. In an approach of this kind, poverty in the world, or the phenomena of exclusion, question the concept of justice. One aspect that is linked to global justice, and which will be studied in our research, is the need for institutional innovation, both political and judicial. This has already been initiated with the creation of the International Criminal Court.
  • The narrative dimension relates to the active participation in the construction of dynamic networks of values that articulate the polis and crystallise the social and cultural tensions present therein. The dialectic pace of narrative and iconographic production of spatial-temporal justice, as well as its cultural impact, has consequences of great importance in the construction of societies and in the birth of new forms of community.
  • The dimension of cultural diversity relates to the “cultural turn” in human and social sciences and the relevance of this turn for a theory of justice which must take into account the intersection of global and local processes, the meeting places and the subjection of alterity, with their narrative and iconographic, socio-political and institutional expressions, wherein emerge the identities and senses of justice that persist and change through time.
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
You are here: